quincampoix:

László Moholy-Nagy, Composition A XXI, 1925

quincampoix:

László Moholy-Nagy, Composition A XXI, 1925

(via rosswolfe)

prostheticknowledge:

INSIDE
New game announced by the creators of Limbo looks like it will be a stunning piece of visual narrative - video embedded below:


Since the release of LIMBO in 2010, Playdead has been working very hard on their next game, INSIDE. Expect INSIDE in the first half of 2015, debuting on Xbox.

More Here
prostheticknowledge:

INSIDE
New game announced by the creators of Limbo looks like it will be a stunning piece of visual narrative - video embedded below:


Since the release of LIMBO in 2010, Playdead has been working very hard on their next game, INSIDE. Expect INSIDE in the first half of 2015, debuting on Xbox.

More Here
prostheticknowledge:

INSIDE
New game announced by the creators of Limbo looks like it will be a stunning piece of visual narrative - video embedded below:


Since the release of LIMBO in 2010, Playdead has been working very hard on their next game, INSIDE. Expect INSIDE in the first half of 2015, debuting on Xbox.

More Here
prostheticknowledge:

INSIDE
New game announced by the creators of Limbo looks like it will be a stunning piece of visual narrative - video embedded below:


Since the release of LIMBO in 2010, Playdead has been working very hard on their next game, INSIDE. Expect INSIDE in the first half of 2015, debuting on Xbox.

More Here

prostheticknowledge:

INSIDE

New game announced by the creators of Limbo looks like it will be a stunning piece of visual narrative - video embedded below:

Since the release of LIMBO in 2010, Playdead has been working very hard on their next game, INSIDE. Expect INSIDE in the first half of 2015, debuting on Xbox.

More Here

rudygodinez:

Oliver Byrne, Eight Page Spreads from “The First Six Books of the Elements of Euclid”, (1847)
Red, yellow, blue – and of course black – are the colors that Oliver Byrne employs for the figures and diagrams in his most unusual 1847 edition of Euclid, published by William Pickering and printed by Chiswick Press, and which prompt the surprised reader to think of Mondrian. The author makes it clear in his subtitle that this is a didactic measure intended to distinguish his edition from all others: “The Elements of Euclid in which colored diagrams and symbols are used instead of letters for the greater ease of learners.” Byrne is not content to trust solely in the supposed intuitive “logical” structure of Euclid’s axioms and theorems – who doesn’t know the first famous sentences of Euclid’s Elements: "I. A point is that which has no parts. II. A line is length without breadth"? –, but translates them into colorful diagrams and symbols. He thereby thinks in terms of the school classroom: he compares his colors to the dyed chalks in which figures are drawn on the blackboard.
Oliver Byrne was an Irish author and civil engineer. Little is known about his life, though he wrote a considerable number of books. As Surveyor of Her Majesty’s Settlements in the Falkland Islands, Byrne had already published mathematical and engineering works, but never anything like his edition on Euclid. This remarkable example of Victorian printing has been described as one of the oddest and most beautiful books of the 19th century.
Each proposition is set in Caslon italic, with a four-line initial, while the rest of the page is a unique riot of red, yellow and blue. On some pages, letters and numbers only are printed in color, sprinkled over the pages like tiny wild flowers and demanding the most meticulous alignment of the different color plates for printing. Elsewhere, solid squares, triangles and circles are printed in bright colors, expressing a verve not seen again on the pages of a book until the era of Dufy, Matisse and Derain.
rudygodinez:

Oliver Byrne, Eight Page Spreads from “The First Six Books of the Elements of Euclid”, (1847)
Red, yellow, blue – and of course black – are the colors that Oliver Byrne employs for the figures and diagrams in his most unusual 1847 edition of Euclid, published by William Pickering and printed by Chiswick Press, and which prompt the surprised reader to think of Mondrian. The author makes it clear in his subtitle that this is a didactic measure intended to distinguish his edition from all others: “The Elements of Euclid in which colored diagrams and symbols are used instead of letters for the greater ease of learners.” Byrne is not content to trust solely in the supposed intuitive “logical” structure of Euclid’s axioms and theorems – who doesn’t know the first famous sentences of Euclid’s Elements: "I. A point is that which has no parts. II. A line is length without breadth"? –, but translates them into colorful diagrams and symbols. He thereby thinks in terms of the school classroom: he compares his colors to the dyed chalks in which figures are drawn on the blackboard.
Oliver Byrne was an Irish author and civil engineer. Little is known about his life, though he wrote a considerable number of books. As Surveyor of Her Majesty’s Settlements in the Falkland Islands, Byrne had already published mathematical and engineering works, but never anything like his edition on Euclid. This remarkable example of Victorian printing has been described as one of the oddest and most beautiful books of the 19th century.
Each proposition is set in Caslon italic, with a four-line initial, while the rest of the page is a unique riot of red, yellow and blue. On some pages, letters and numbers only are printed in color, sprinkled over the pages like tiny wild flowers and demanding the most meticulous alignment of the different color plates for printing. Elsewhere, solid squares, triangles and circles are printed in bright colors, expressing a verve not seen again on the pages of a book until the era of Dufy, Matisse and Derain.
rudygodinez:

Oliver Byrne, Eight Page Spreads from “The First Six Books of the Elements of Euclid”, (1847)
Red, yellow, blue – and of course black – are the colors that Oliver Byrne employs for the figures and diagrams in his most unusual 1847 edition of Euclid, published by William Pickering and printed by Chiswick Press, and which prompt the surprised reader to think of Mondrian. The author makes it clear in his subtitle that this is a didactic measure intended to distinguish his edition from all others: “The Elements of Euclid in which colored diagrams and symbols are used instead of letters for the greater ease of learners.” Byrne is not content to trust solely in the supposed intuitive “logical” structure of Euclid’s axioms and theorems – who doesn’t know the first famous sentences of Euclid’s Elements: "I. A point is that which has no parts. II. A line is length without breadth"? –, but translates them into colorful diagrams and symbols. He thereby thinks in terms of the school classroom: he compares his colors to the dyed chalks in which figures are drawn on the blackboard.
Oliver Byrne was an Irish author and civil engineer. Little is known about his life, though he wrote a considerable number of books. As Surveyor of Her Majesty’s Settlements in the Falkland Islands, Byrne had already published mathematical and engineering works, but never anything like his edition on Euclid. This remarkable example of Victorian printing has been described as one of the oddest and most beautiful books of the 19th century.
Each proposition is set in Caslon italic, with a four-line initial, while the rest of the page is a unique riot of red, yellow and blue. On some pages, letters and numbers only are printed in color, sprinkled over the pages like tiny wild flowers and demanding the most meticulous alignment of the different color plates for printing. Elsewhere, solid squares, triangles and circles are printed in bright colors, expressing a verve not seen again on the pages of a book until the era of Dufy, Matisse and Derain.
rudygodinez:

Oliver Byrne, Eight Page Spreads from “The First Six Books of the Elements of Euclid”, (1847)
Red, yellow, blue – and of course black – are the colors that Oliver Byrne employs for the figures and diagrams in his most unusual 1847 edition of Euclid, published by William Pickering and printed by Chiswick Press, and which prompt the surprised reader to think of Mondrian. The author makes it clear in his subtitle that this is a didactic measure intended to distinguish his edition from all others: “The Elements of Euclid in which colored diagrams and symbols are used instead of letters for the greater ease of learners.” Byrne is not content to trust solely in the supposed intuitive “logical” structure of Euclid’s axioms and theorems – who doesn’t know the first famous sentences of Euclid’s Elements: "I. A point is that which has no parts. II. A line is length without breadth"? –, but translates them into colorful diagrams and symbols. He thereby thinks in terms of the school classroom: he compares his colors to the dyed chalks in which figures are drawn on the blackboard.
Oliver Byrne was an Irish author and civil engineer. Little is known about his life, though he wrote a considerable number of books. As Surveyor of Her Majesty’s Settlements in the Falkland Islands, Byrne had already published mathematical and engineering works, but never anything like his edition on Euclid. This remarkable example of Victorian printing has been described as one of the oddest and most beautiful books of the 19th century.
Each proposition is set in Caslon italic, with a four-line initial, while the rest of the page is a unique riot of red, yellow and blue. On some pages, letters and numbers only are printed in color, sprinkled over the pages like tiny wild flowers and demanding the most meticulous alignment of the different color plates for printing. Elsewhere, solid squares, triangles and circles are printed in bright colors, expressing a verve not seen again on the pages of a book until the era of Dufy, Matisse and Derain.
rudygodinez:

Oliver Byrne, Eight Page Spreads from “The First Six Books of the Elements of Euclid”, (1847)
Red, yellow, blue – and of course black – are the colors that Oliver Byrne employs for the figures and diagrams in his most unusual 1847 edition of Euclid, published by William Pickering and printed by Chiswick Press, and which prompt the surprised reader to think of Mondrian. The author makes it clear in his subtitle that this is a didactic measure intended to distinguish his edition from all others: “The Elements of Euclid in which colored diagrams and symbols are used instead of letters for the greater ease of learners.” Byrne is not content to trust solely in the supposed intuitive “logical” structure of Euclid’s axioms and theorems – who doesn’t know the first famous sentences of Euclid’s Elements: "I. A point is that which has no parts. II. A line is length without breadth"? –, but translates them into colorful diagrams and symbols. He thereby thinks in terms of the school classroom: he compares his colors to the dyed chalks in which figures are drawn on the blackboard.
Oliver Byrne was an Irish author and civil engineer. Little is known about his life, though he wrote a considerable number of books. As Surveyor of Her Majesty’s Settlements in the Falkland Islands, Byrne had already published mathematical and engineering works, but never anything like his edition on Euclid. This remarkable example of Victorian printing has been described as one of the oddest and most beautiful books of the 19th century.
Each proposition is set in Caslon italic, with a four-line initial, while the rest of the page is a unique riot of red, yellow and blue. On some pages, letters and numbers only are printed in color, sprinkled over the pages like tiny wild flowers and demanding the most meticulous alignment of the different color plates for printing. Elsewhere, solid squares, triangles and circles are printed in bright colors, expressing a verve not seen again on the pages of a book until the era of Dufy, Matisse and Derain.
rudygodinez:

Oliver Byrne, Eight Page Spreads from “The First Six Books of the Elements of Euclid”, (1847)
Red, yellow, blue – and of course black – are the colors that Oliver Byrne employs for the figures and diagrams in his most unusual 1847 edition of Euclid, published by William Pickering and printed by Chiswick Press, and which prompt the surprised reader to think of Mondrian. The author makes it clear in his subtitle that this is a didactic measure intended to distinguish his edition from all others: “The Elements of Euclid in which colored diagrams and symbols are used instead of letters for the greater ease of learners.” Byrne is not content to trust solely in the supposed intuitive “logical” structure of Euclid’s axioms and theorems – who doesn’t know the first famous sentences of Euclid’s Elements: "I. A point is that which has no parts. II. A line is length without breadth"? –, but translates them into colorful diagrams and symbols. He thereby thinks in terms of the school classroom: he compares his colors to the dyed chalks in which figures are drawn on the blackboard.
Oliver Byrne was an Irish author and civil engineer. Little is known about his life, though he wrote a considerable number of books. As Surveyor of Her Majesty’s Settlements in the Falkland Islands, Byrne had already published mathematical and engineering works, but never anything like his edition on Euclid. This remarkable example of Victorian printing has been described as one of the oddest and most beautiful books of the 19th century.
Each proposition is set in Caslon italic, with a four-line initial, while the rest of the page is a unique riot of red, yellow and blue. On some pages, letters and numbers only are printed in color, sprinkled over the pages like tiny wild flowers and demanding the most meticulous alignment of the different color plates for printing. Elsewhere, solid squares, triangles and circles are printed in bright colors, expressing a verve not seen again on the pages of a book until the era of Dufy, Matisse and Derain.
rudygodinez:

Oliver Byrne, Eight Page Spreads from “The First Six Books of the Elements of Euclid”, (1847)
Red, yellow, blue – and of course black – are the colors that Oliver Byrne employs for the figures and diagrams in his most unusual 1847 edition of Euclid, published by William Pickering and printed by Chiswick Press, and which prompt the surprised reader to think of Mondrian. The author makes it clear in his subtitle that this is a didactic measure intended to distinguish his edition from all others: “The Elements of Euclid in which colored diagrams and symbols are used instead of letters for the greater ease of learners.” Byrne is not content to trust solely in the supposed intuitive “logical” structure of Euclid’s axioms and theorems – who doesn’t know the first famous sentences of Euclid’s Elements: "I. A point is that which has no parts. II. A line is length without breadth"? –, but translates them into colorful diagrams and symbols. He thereby thinks in terms of the school classroom: he compares his colors to the dyed chalks in which figures are drawn on the blackboard.
Oliver Byrne was an Irish author and civil engineer. Little is known about his life, though he wrote a considerable number of books. As Surveyor of Her Majesty’s Settlements in the Falkland Islands, Byrne had already published mathematical and engineering works, but never anything like his edition on Euclid. This remarkable example of Victorian printing has been described as one of the oddest and most beautiful books of the 19th century.
Each proposition is set in Caslon italic, with a four-line initial, while the rest of the page is a unique riot of red, yellow and blue. On some pages, letters and numbers only are printed in color, sprinkled over the pages like tiny wild flowers and demanding the most meticulous alignment of the different color plates for printing. Elsewhere, solid squares, triangles and circles are printed in bright colors, expressing a verve not seen again on the pages of a book until the era of Dufy, Matisse and Derain.
rudygodinez:

Oliver Byrne, Eight Page Spreads from “The First Six Books of the Elements of Euclid”, (1847)
Red, yellow, blue – and of course black – are the colors that Oliver Byrne employs for the figures and diagrams in his most unusual 1847 edition of Euclid, published by William Pickering and printed by Chiswick Press, and which prompt the surprised reader to think of Mondrian. The author makes it clear in his subtitle that this is a didactic measure intended to distinguish his edition from all others: “The Elements of Euclid in which colored diagrams and symbols are used instead of letters for the greater ease of learners.” Byrne is not content to trust solely in the supposed intuitive “logical” structure of Euclid’s axioms and theorems – who doesn’t know the first famous sentences of Euclid’s Elements: "I. A point is that which has no parts. II. A line is length without breadth"? –, but translates them into colorful diagrams and symbols. He thereby thinks in terms of the school classroom: he compares his colors to the dyed chalks in which figures are drawn on the blackboard.
Oliver Byrne was an Irish author and civil engineer. Little is known about his life, though he wrote a considerable number of books. As Surveyor of Her Majesty’s Settlements in the Falkland Islands, Byrne had already published mathematical and engineering works, but never anything like his edition on Euclid. This remarkable example of Victorian printing has been described as one of the oddest and most beautiful books of the 19th century.
Each proposition is set in Caslon italic, with a four-line initial, while the rest of the page is a unique riot of red, yellow and blue. On some pages, letters and numbers only are printed in color, sprinkled over the pages like tiny wild flowers and demanding the most meticulous alignment of the different color plates for printing. Elsewhere, solid squares, triangles and circles are printed in bright colors, expressing a verve not seen again on the pages of a book until the era of Dufy, Matisse and Derain.

rudygodinez:

Oliver Byrne, Eight Page Spreads fromThe First Six Books of the Elements of Euclid”, (1847)

Red, yellow, blue – and of course black – are the colors that Oliver Byrne employs for the figures and diagrams in his most unusual 1847 edition of Euclid, published by William Pickering and printed by Chiswick Press, and which prompt the surprised reader to think of Mondrian. The author makes it clear in his subtitle that this is a didactic measure intended to distinguish his edition from all others: “The Elements of Euclid in which colored diagrams and symbols are used instead of letters for the greater ease of learners.” Byrne is not content to trust solely in the supposed intuitive “logical” structure of Euclid’s axioms and theorems – who doesn’t know the first famous sentences of Euclid’s Elements: "I. A point is that which has no parts. II. A line is length without breadth"? –, but translates them into colorful diagrams and symbols. He thereby thinks in terms of the school classroom: he compares his colors to the dyed chalks in which figures are drawn on the blackboard.

Oliver Byrne was an Irish author and civil engineer. Little is known about his life, though he wrote a considerable number of books. As Surveyor of Her Majesty’s Settlements in the Falkland Islands, Byrne had already published mathematical and engineering works, but never anything like his edition on Euclid. This remarkable example of Victorian printing has been described as one of the oddest and most beautiful books of the 19th century.

Each proposition is set in Caslon italic, with a four-line initial, while the rest of the page is a unique riot of red, yellow and blue. On some pages, letters and numbers only are printed in color, sprinkled over the pages like tiny wild flowers and demanding the most meticulous alignment of the different color plates for printing. Elsewhere, solid squares, triangles and circles are printed in bright colors, expressing a verve not seen again on the pages of a book until the era of Dufy, Matisse and Derain.

(via rosswolfe)

russianavantgarde:

Ilya Chashnik - Cosmos. Red Circle on Black Plane, 1925

rosswolfe:

Tours of the USSR, 1932. Intourist travel brochure released by Soviet government.
(via http://thecharnelhouse.org/2014/01/27/soviet-travel-brochures-from-the-1930s/)

claeswar:

About 2 Squares, El Lissitzky
claeswar:

About 2 Squares, El Lissitzky
claeswar:

About 2 Squares, El Lissitzky
claeswar:

About 2 Squares, El Lissitzky
claeswar:

About 2 Squares, El Lissitzky
claeswar:

About 2 Squares, El Lissitzky
lacitedesdames:

Sophie Taeuber-Arp, Composition with diagonals and circle, 1916

lacitedesdames:

Sophie Taeuber-Arp, Composition with diagonals and circle, 1916

(via rosswolfe)

rosswolfe:

Iakov Chernikhov, Suprematist Composition (1922)

(via rosswolfe)

tresveal:

Beat the Whites with the Red Wedge - El Lissitzky

Created as a piece of suprematist, political propaganda, this piece of graphic design depicts the Reds ( communists & revolutionaries) beating the Whites (monarchs, conservatives, liberals, and socialists against the Bolshevik Revolution). A powerful message during the Russian Civil War.

(via rosswolfe)

“There are creators in politics, and creative movements, that are poised for a moment in history. Hitler, on the contrary, lacked to a singular degree any Nietzschean element. Hitler is not Zarathoustra. Nor is Trujillo. They represented what Nietzsche calls “the monkey of Zarathoustra.” As Nietzsche said, if one wants to be “a master,” it is not enough to come to power. More often than not it is the “slaves” who come to power, and who keep it, and who remain slaves while they keep it.
The masters according to Nietzsche are the untimely, those who create, who destroy in order to create, not to preserve. Nietzsche says that under the huge earth-shattering events are tiny silent events, which he likens to the creation of new worlds: there once again you see the presence of the poetic under the historical. In France, for instance, there are no earth-shattering events right now. They are far away, and horrible, in Vietnam. But we still have tiny imperceptible events, which maybe announce an exodus from today’s desert. Maybe the return to Nietzsche is one of those “tiny events” and already a reinterpretation of the world.”
— Gilles Deleuze, in an interview with Guy Dumur, from Le Nouvel Observateur, April 5, 1967, pp. 40-41. (via sisyphean-revolt)

(via deleuzenotes)

“Deleuze’s transcendental method is a form of critique quite different from ideology. Ideology has to assume that there are real interests that are concealed: that women, say, really want to be liberated but are duped by ideology. Ideology also has to assume some normative form of the individual who awaits liberation from the imposed illusions of culture. Such an approach has a negative concept of power and the imagination; power is what oppresses or distorts an otherwise ‘real’ world, and imagination is the faculty of delusion.

From a transcendental point of view, though, we cannot assume real interests, nor some pre-social and essential individual that we might discover underneath power and images. The first step of transcendental method for Deleuze is to show how persons and interests are produced from the chaotic flows of desire. Deleuze and Guattari refer to this as ‘micropolitics’.”
— Claire Colebrook, Gilles Deleuze (p 92)